Peer Knowledge

6 12 2011

What I thought was interesting is the lack of knowledge by my very own peers at Chapman University about the process of recycling bottle caps and the harm it does.  Mentioning this topic to my Internet Communications class, only one hand went up indicating that the student was aware of the proper disposal of plastic bottles and their tops, and the reason why they can not be recycled together.  Surveying 15 other random people on campus, I found that fourteen out of fifteen recycle plastic bottles.  Three students take the caps off the bottles before recycling, while eleven leave the cap on and one does not take it off, but does not put it back on if the cap is already off. Two of the three students who do take the cap off, throw the cap away in the trash, while only one student put it in the recycling bin, fully informed of the reasons behind this recycling process.  The majority of people do not take the caps off for reasons such as: “I’m too lazy”, “It’s easier”, “You assume they want the whole bottle”, “The cap is plastic too”, and “I don’t want them loose in the bag.”

What Chapman University and the rest of society needs, is knowledge on the topic of recycling plastics.  I believe a lot of these people would care more and do the right thing if they were taught properly on how and what to recycle. The way in which society is recycling is just habit and due to a lack of knowledge.  I believe that if Chapman gets on board, the word can quickly spread as students tell their family and friends who do the same thing, creating a sustainable society.

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The Issue

6 12 2011

One of the biggest issues, is that the right answer when referring to what one should do with their bottle caps, is slightly unclear, even within the waste management companies.  Credible sources need to publish more information about the process and what the correct thing to do is, so people can make a change. Bottle caps and the bottle itself are made of two different plastics. Bottle caps are labeled with a 5 (the resin identification code), while the bottles are labeled usually 1 or 2.  Recycling centers only take certain resin identification coded plastics, depending on the location.  Even if a recycling center nearby takes plastics labeled 1, 2, and 5, they do not all get recycled together.  The higher the number, the higher melting point the plastic has.  If the caps and bottles were to all be recycled together, the bottle caps would shatter rather than melt due to the decreased heat.  These shatters cause a problem as they jam the machines that need to be running all the time to take care of the waste humans create.  While melting the bottles, pressure is created due to the heat and the rest of the recycling process.  This pressure can be dangerous as caps can pop off the bottle and injure workers at the recycling centers.

Because machines can get jammed and workers can get injured, bottles that still have the caps screwed on are most times thrown away, and headed towards the dump. This causes problems as our landfills are filling up and plastic does not decompose well.

As a little background information, I have added this video that goes through the process of recycling plastic.

To verify my information, I interviewed Malia Walker, a worker in the customer service department of Waste Management of Orange County.  She confirmed my research that “it is better to keep the caps off the bottles because it is better for the process of the bottles getting smashed down”.  I always wondered what I should do with the cap after I take it off, and Malia Walker said that it is best to also place these in the recycle bin.  As stated earlier, I wanted to collect bottle caps to raise money for breast cancer, but between Malia and snopes.com (a rumor has it site), it seems as though there is no where to collect money to be donate in exchange for the bottle caps.





Cap Collecting

6 12 2011

What to throw away, what to recycle, and how to go about these processes can sometimes be controversial, even when talking to people in the recycling business.  Through research on the topic, I have discovered that leaving the caps screwed onto the bottles takes the bottles out of the recycling process, and straight to landfills.

What I am asking, is for everyone to be more informed about this topic so our recycling efforts do not go to waste.  To begin this process, I would like to start small with the Chapman University community.  I am requesting Jerry Price, the Dean of Students, to help me in this effort by printing signs for each recycling bin to inform the students that bottle caps need to be taken off, but may still be thrown in with the recycle bin.  I feel as though Dean Price would help me out with my efforts because he is very supportive of the student body and cares very much about meeting the needs of Chapman’s students.  Our campus has a goal to be as sustainable as it can be, so why not make cap removal a habit?

I am writing this blog to inform my readers about the importance of recycling and the correct way to do so.  I originally hoped to collect bottle caps and turn them in for money to be donated towards breast cancer research, but it turns out there are not facilities that do this.  Instead, I will tell my readers about the causes they can donate these caps to, and the locations that accept plastic bottle caps.